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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
take on what we've just heard from governor snyder and also the current state of the fiscal cliff negotiations in washington is our colleague and friend ruth marcus from "the washington post." columnist for "the washington post." ruth, this whole issue in the midwest, this used to be most likely in the southern states, but this really is moving, and we're seeing a real decline in union household membership about half what it was 40 years ago. it used to be 24%. now it's 11.8%. >> unions are reeling, and the more states that enact measures like this, the more unions will be reeling. their penetration, the private sector is something like 7% of the private sector work force is unionized, and i have to say -- i don't use words like this very often, i thought some of the governor's comments were kind of orwelian to suggest this was a pro-worker move. it's clearly a move that may help businesses, but what a kick in the teeth to autoworkers unions, who as you correctly point d out, gave a lot back to help the auto industry get back on its feet, the notion that we had to do this now with
what happens he had to say on the "today" show about who knows what about the fiscal cliff and the budget negotiations. >> these guys if you gave half of them -- gave 90% of them a profit and loss statement in one hand and a balance sheet in the other they wouldn't know how to read it. >> so, alan simpson not making himself the most popular among former colleagues. what is your sense? how well do the members who are going to be voting on the stuff understand, both what's in this deal or could be in the deal and what the consequences are? >> typically how this works out those with the most expertise are closest to the process of the deal making, what might be on the table, off the table. and that seems to benefit all sides. people with the most knowledge of this. when it does come to the vote, which is the ultimate answer here, there can be a lot of that within the party arm twisting. it's fair to say that not every member of the senate, and certainly not every member of the house, has expertise on issues of this sort of magnitude. but there are all kind of held accountable
, they're better off if -- they're better off than republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff. they have leverage from the campaign. that's the directionion -- speaker boehner today kept the door open to raising rates on the wealthy as part of a negotiating plan. >> at the white house, what are you hearing as to how much flexibility the president thinks he has? >> it's interesting. i had an interesting conversation yesterday with senator sheldon, white house democrat from rhode island, on the senate budget committee, he said look if we go through january 1st without a deal, it's not the end of the world. it will be the end of the world if they never get resolved. if they don't get resolved until mid january or february we'll be okay. from the white house and democrats we want a deal but not afraid to go past this deadline without a deal as susan said, they know they have the upper hand and waiting for republicans to bend. >> you've been looking at this from the per spective the wise men who used to be in leadership and take a look at what happened you wrote about mitch mcconnell and his
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)